Being an Effective Change Manager

As Heraclitus, a Greek philosopher, once said (updated with current protocol), “No person steps in the same river twice, for it’s not the same river and they’re not the same person

So, it would stand to reason that, if the only constant in life is change, then we are all, in fact, the change manager of our own life, both personally and professionally.

Why then, does the role of a Change Manager exist?

Similar to a personal trainer, financial advisor or guidance counsellor, during times of significant change, an experienced and qualified change manager can provide people with the required support, within each step of the process, to make effective choices and ensure a smooth transition.

Given there are different circumstances and types of change, the role of a Change Manager can take on many forms and the will depend on the findings of, what I term, the Third ‘I’ Review©:

  • Intention: accepting change is occurring and being real about the mental state that represents a commitment to carrying out an action or actions in the future. It involves mental activities such as strategy, planning and forethought and requires identification of desired outcomes.
  • Insight & Intuition: gaining an understanding of the impact of change; the cause and effect based on relationships and behaviours within a model, context, or scenario. It is the power of a piece of information, acute observation and deduction, introspection, discernment, and perception.
  • Identification: ability to define the change, the core good or service being produced and supplied, as well as distinguishing between an individual and/or a organisational change that will determine the appropriate change management frameworks, tools and techniques to apply; a change within health care would be different to one in information technology, as would a change to physical well-being compared to a change in the way we work.

Regardless of the result of the Third ‘I’ Review©, here are my top 3 tips for being an effective Change Manager:

  1. Realise it’s not a one-person role (or the role of one team);

An effective Change Manager has the ability to partner, influence and build lasting relationships with people within the community. In the context of business, change management would be architected by change management professionals but is developed with, and executed by, many players across all levels of the organisation; from top-level executives to front line supervisors and includes specialists from human resources and organisational development, impacted employees and designated resources.

  1. Recognise the meaning behind the change

There is always a reason for the change. The more a Change Manager can assist in identifying, clarifying and specifying the reason, the more likely it is that people will understand the need to change, develop a desire and willingness to change and be open to connecting with others around a common purpose or collective vision that will bring the change to fruition.

  1. Know it’s more than just a process

While there are a number of proven Change Management approaches and methodologies that outline a set of steps to follow, these need to be continuously tailored in line with the Third ‘I’ Review©, current trends and innovative practices, including customer experience, design thinking, value management and business agility. Not to mention that a Change Manager deals with the people side of change – and people bring with them a constant challenge of uncertainty and complexity.

When it comes to change, you are, without a doubt, your own Change Manager. You can either go it alone or you can seek the guidance and support of an experienced and professional practitioner, someone who can support and guide you in the direction you seek – it’s up to you!

Courtney ‘Co-Creator’ Wilson

m: +61 (0)417 107 888| e: courtney.connect@outlook.com

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